Presbyterians of the Past

The lives, places, writings, and events of Reformed history



The French Huguenots were one of the persecuted groups that sought religious and political freedom in the colony of South Carolina. Many of the Huguenots that moved to the colonies were poor as well as persecuted, so they pursued new opportunities on the other side of the Atlantic in a new land. The Guillebeau “pioneer […]

As has been noted often on Presbyterians of the Past, this year is the five-hundredth anniversary of Martin Luther posting his theses regarding some of the practices of Roman Catholicism, but those of us with Presbyterian and Reformed interests seem to have turned it into another Calvin 500th birthday remembrance. The Lutheran and Reformed confessional […]

The military chaplaincy in the United States began with the presidency of George Washington. However, by the time of The Great War there were a number of non-militarily connected organizations involved in support services. For example, Roman Catholicism was not only represented by chaplains in the military but also by the Knights of Columbus. Other […]

Following the First World War, J. Gresham Machen had concluded his work with the YMCA and was travelling in France while awaiting his return to the United States. In a letter written in February 1919, he mentioned to his mother, Mary (Minnie) Gresham Machen, that he had spent a night in Dijon. The city, likely associated more with mustard […]

In nineteenth-century Macon, Georgia, one of the most respected citizens was John Jones Gresham (1812-1891). He was at various points in his life an attorney, a judge, the mayor of Macon, a state senator, an investor in the Georgia textile industry, a farmer, a member of the county board of education, and for over forty […]

Church Design—Lighting

July 22nd, 2017, at 1:00 pm

In the colonial days of America congregations sometimes met outdoors for services because they did not have a building for worship. A group interested in having a church in their settlement gathered in the shade of a large tree or under the canopy of a forest or orchard. In at least one case a group […]

Bishop of Hippo Augustine created a massive body of works which is often appealed to by Roman Catholics and Protestants alike. The thinking behind the Reformation was seeded by the ad fontes principle of the Renaissance and for theologians the sources were often the church fathers, particularly Augustine. For example, the Battles edition of Calvin’s […]

Cabarrus County is located in North Carolina along the northeast border of Charlotte’s Mecklenburg County. It was established in 1792 and named for Stephen Cabarrus who was at the time the speaker of the North Carolina House of Commons. Cabarrus County holds an important place in American history because gold was first discovered at Reed […]

Church and Saloon—The caption for the picture as it was published in The Church on the Changing Frontier, says “No Room for Both. The Presbyterian Church at Melrose, Montana, and its next-door neighbor, a saloon.” One can imagine a scene in a Sergio Leone western with Clint Eastwood striding towards the saloon with spurs jingling […]