Educators

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George was born November 1, 1790, to Joseph and Eleanor Cochran Junkin on the family farm near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The spiritual ancestors of the Junkins were Covenanters that had entered the American colonies among the Scots-Irish. Eleanor Junkin was surely a busy mother because her fourteen children would have required every second of every day. […]

Charleston, South Carolina, Map, circa 1892

The Huguenot Church at the corner of Queen and Church Streets in Charleston—the only extant Huguenot congregation in the United States—is a reminder of the importance of French Reformed Protestantism to the history of Charleston and the state of South Carolina. Huguenots began leaving France in 1685 due to the revocation of the Edict of […]

When one thinks of the faculty and community of nineteenth-century Princeton Seminary the surnames that come to mind might include Alexander, Miller, Warfield, McGill, Green, and Hodge. The name Hodge would be associated with Charles due to his decades of teaching, writing, activity in the church courts, and publishing. Then the next person one might […]

The issues associated with the place of religion in public education, prayer in the schools, the Ten Commandments, and the Bible have been debated for years. The article available for download at the end of this introduction was originally published in 1887 and it shows the concerns that Dr. Archibald Alexander Hodge, 1823-1886, of Princeton […]

When the Second General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) convened in First Church, Philadelphia, May 20, 1790, the retiring moderator, John Rodgers, delivered his sermon from Acts 11:24, “For he was a good man,” speaking of Barnabas, “and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith: and much […]

Because of the current presidential and other federal elections, news is continually coming out of Washington, which is a city established early in the history of the United States. In 1790, the First Congress was debating and deciding issues such as buying land for what became the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, providing […]

To be a minister for sixty-two years is an accomplishment, but to serve one flock for over six decades is remarkable. During his ministry that spanned beyond three generations, Rev. John McElhenney would have baptized not only children, but also their children, grandchildren, and possibly even their great grandchildren. As those young ones matured he […]

Archibald Alexander was born on July 18, 1823 to Charles and Sarah Bache Hodge in a frame house at the corner of Witherspoon and Main (Nassau Street) across from the Princeton College campus. He was named for Charles’s mentor, colleague, friend, and Princeton Seminary’s first professor, Archibald Alexander. A brick house was built by the […]

The home of Henry Kollock’s parents was in Elizabeth Town, New Jersey. However, Elizabeth Town was strategically located near Newark Bay and across from Staten Island both of which gave direct access via boat for the British troops occupying Long Island during the American Revolution. Shepard and Susannah Kollock moved to New Providence, about twelve […]

It may seem unlikely, but Presbyterian seminary professor B. B. Warfield has at least one thing in common with America’s humorist, social commentator, and author, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name, Mark Twain. The familiar quip, “The rumors of my death are greatly exaggerated,” has been quoted correctly and incorrectly by many […]

The walking distance by the most direct route from the location of what was once Washington College in Washington County, Tennessee, to the Presbyterian seminary in Princeton, New Jersey, is just short of six-hundred miles. If one was to make the trek today it would run parallel to modern roads including I-81 through the Shenandoah […]

Dr. Samuel Miller’s eldest daughter, Margaret, made the acquaintance of John Breckinridge during his student years in the village of Princeton and they were married in January 1823. They enjoyed a happy marriage and were blessed with six children, three of which grew to maturity. John’s marriage to the daughter of a Princeton educator was […]