Church Courts

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The state of South Carolina is rich with Presbyterian and Reformed history because of its early settlement by Presbyterian Ulster Scots, Highlanders, Hebrideans, and others from the land of tartans and the Emerald Isle, as well as the Huguenots who were Reformed immigrants from France via a number of routes as they fled persecution. The […]

On April 8, 1835, Bethel Presbytery organized its new church in Lancaster, South Carolina. The church needed a teaching shepherd, so elders who had seen James Thornwell examined for licensure encouraged the congregation to approve presenting him a call through presbytery. On June 12, 1835, after some soul-searching about his spiritual qualifications and calling to […]

William Buell, youngest child of Benjamin and Sybil (Buell) Sprague, was born in Andover, Tolland county, Connecticut, October 16, 1795. As a boy he showed a keen interest in learning, was a voracious reader, and worked long and hard to hone his speaking and writing skills. After attending the common school of Andover and the […]

When the Second General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) convened in First Church, Philadelphia, May 20, 1790, the retiring moderator, John Rodgers, delivered his sermon from Acts 11:24, “For he was a good man,” speaking of Barnabas, “and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith: and much […]

[The following article was originally posted on Presbyterians of the Past on August 17, 2015. In light of the recent discussion regarding the adoption of a logo by the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), the denomination’s members may be interested in reading about the difficulty Presbyterians of the past encountered when adopting a logo.] The Snake is Discarded Believe […]

As resources are added to the Internet daily, more and more publications, manuscripts, judicatory minutes, images, and other materials relevant to Presbyterian and Reformed history and theology are becoming available. Those who are interested in Presbyterians of the past have a considerable amount of material readily accessible via their fingertips dancing across the keys at […]

Flournoy was born to Joel Alexander and Lucetta Cheatham Shepperson in Columbus, Arkansas, January 10, 1883.  His education included a Bachelor of Arts from Arkansas College after which he completed his ministerial studies in Union Theological Seminary in Virginia.  The seminary at the time included in its faculty, G. B. Strickler, T. C. Johnson, W. […]

The transcription that follows is the text of a paper originally delivered by Stuart Robinson to the First General Presbyterian Council, which convened in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1877. Robinson had represented the United States churches in the committee that organized the council. Once the council convened, he was the chairman, i.e. moderator, of the morning […]

It may seem unlikely, but Presbyterian seminary professor B. B. Warfield has at least one thing in common with America’s humorist, social commentator, and author, Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known by his pen name, Mark Twain. The familiar quip, “The rumors of my death are greatly exaggerated,” has been quoted correctly and incorrectly by many […]

John was born in Boston on August 5, 1727, to Thomas and Elizabeth Baxter Rodgers. Within a few months, the family including two sons and six daughters moved to Philadelphia. When he was about twelve years of age, John had several opportunities to hear George Whitfield preach and it was during this time that he […]

The Snake is Discarded

August 17th, 2015, at 3:55 pm

Believe it or not there was a day when major city newspapers reported at length on the proceedings of the church denominations when they convened for the meetings of their highest organizational gathering whether it was a convention, synod, or general assembly. In 1891, the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) held […]