South Carolina

Page 1 of 2


The French Huguenots were one of the persecuted groups that sought religious and political freedom in the colony of South Carolina. Many of the Huguenots that moved to the colonies were poor as well as persecuted, so they pursued new opportunities on the other side of the Atlantic in a new land. The Guillebeau “pioneer […]

James Woodrow was born in Carlisle, England, May 30, 1828, the son of Rev. Thomas Woodrow, D.D., a native of Scotland. In 1886 the family moved to Canada, then the next year settled in the United States in Chillicothe, Ohio, where Rev. Woodrow was installed pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. James’s preparatory education for […]

Abel McIver Fraser was born in Sumter, South Carolina, June 14, 1856, to Thomas Boone and Sarah Margaret McIver Fraser. For many years Abel’s father was a Presbyterian ruling elder working in various judicatory committees and was a director of Columbia Theological Seminary, while professionally he was a lawyer, a judge for sixteen years, and he […]

Charleston, South Carolina, Map, circa 1892

The Huguenot Church at the corner of Queen and Church Streets in Charleston—the only extant Huguenot congregation in the United States—is a reminder of the importance of French Reformed Protestantism to the history of Charleston and the state of South Carolina. Huguenots began leaving France in 1685 due to the revocation of the Edict of […]

Chicora College for Women

September 28th, 2016, at 1:00 pm

Up until roughly the end of the nineteenth century, the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA), the Presbyterian Church in the United States (PCUS), and other Presbyterian and Reformed denominations opened and operated many educational institutions. Chicora College was one of several Presbyterian schools operated in South Carolina that has either closed or […]

The state of South Carolina is rich with Presbyterian and Reformed history because of its early settlement by Presbyterian Ulster Scots, Highlanders, Hebrideans, and others from the land of tartans and the Emerald Isle, as well as the Huguenots who were Reformed immigrants from France via a number of routes as they fled persecution. The […]

When I have occasion to visit churches while traveling, there are three churches I particularly enjoy worshipping in and wandering their properties because of their great histories, faithful preaching, and the historic appeal of their facilities.  One place of worship is the Independent Presbyterian Church, Savannah, Georgia, where the Word has been preached for over […]

On April 8, 1835, Bethel Presbytery organized its new church in Lancaster, South Carolina. The church needed a teaching shepherd, so elders who had seen James Thornwell examined for licensure encouraged the congregation to approve presenting him a call through presbytery. On June 12, 1835, after some soul-searching about his spiritual qualifications and calling to […]

Flournoy was born to Joel Alexander and Lucetta Cheatham Shepperson in Columbus, Arkansas, January 10, 1883.  His education included a Bachelor of Arts from Arkansas College after which he completed his ministerial studies in Union Theological Seminary in Virginia.  The seminary at the time included in its faculty, G. B. Strickler, T. C. Johnson, W. […]

While wandering inside a used book store several years ago, an endeavor that is increasingly becoming more difficult due to their closing left and right, I ran across a book regarding a past Presbyterian that I had not seen nor heard of before. It was one of those eureka moments when one believes the foxed and […]

Edwin Cater was born in the scenic South Carolina Low Country in Beaufort County, November 1, 1813. He was orphaned at a young age, so the family of his uncle, Rev. Richard Cater, took him in and saw to his needs. Rev. Cater was pastor of the Presbyterian Church in Barnwell. At the age of […]

The walking distance by the most direct route from the location of what was once Washington College in Washington County, Tennessee, to the Presbyterian seminary in Princeton, New Jersey, is just short of six-hundred miles. If one was to make the trek today it would run parallel to modern roads including I-81 through the Shenandoah […]