Protestant Reformation

Page 2 of 2


Scott M. Manetsch’s Calvin’s Company of Pastors: Pastoral Care and the Emerging Reformed Church, 1536-1609, Oxford, 2013, paper 2015, presents a lesser known aspect of John Calvin’s life and work. Calvin is not often described in a pastoral context by those who write about his life. For example, Robert Godfrey’s, John Calvin: Pilgrim and Pastor, […]

Several years ago while wandering through what is increasingly becoming harder to find, a bookstore, I ran across a copy of Susan Brigden’s, London and the Reformation. I would have loved to have purchased it but the sticker price was too high for my budget. Over the years I have checked for used copies online […]

In April 1917 the United States, after a prolonged attempt by the Wilson administration to maintain neutrality, declared war on Germany. The next month the general assemblies of the two largest American Presbyterian denominations convened for their annual proceedings. October 31, 1917 would be the four-hundredth anniversary (quadricentennial) of the posting of Luther’s theses. So, on […]

The following article is about the marriage of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in England. It is the first of some occasional articles that will be posted for the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of his theses in Wittenberg. Even though interest in the wedding in 2011 has passed, one of the ministries provided […]

The year 2017 marks the quincentennial of Martin Luther’s posting on the Castle Church door in Wittenberg his Ninety-Five Theses regarding the Roman Catholic Church’s use of indulgences. Indulgences allowed the parishioner to reduce or eliminate works of penance for confessed sins. Luther’s call to debate indulgences is considered the beginning of the Reformation. Even though […]

The following article is divided into two sections. The first section provides information about the invention of movable type printing by Johann Gutenberg and the operation of his innovative technology; the second section considers the importance of printing for the propagation and success of the Reformation by looking at how Martin Luther embraced the process […]

This year Reformation Day marks the 499th remembrance of Martin Luther’s presentation of his theses against Roman Catholicism’s use of indulgences and it anticipates the celebration of the quincentennial in 2017. Luther presented the theses–originally titled A Disputation of Doctor Martin Luther on the Power and Efficacy of Indulgences–by nailing them to the Castle Church door in Wittenberg. […]

In this last posting of the series of articles remembering Reformation Day 2015 some brief comments regarding resources for study of the Reformation will be provided, a short definition of indulgences will be given, sacerdotal will be defined, some comments made regarding B. B. Warfield’s article “The Ninety-Five Theses in their Theological Significance,” and there will be […]

Keeping with the Protestant Reformation theme for the postings in October, T. C. Johnson’s book, John Calvin and The Genevan Reformation: A Sketch, Richmond, 1900, will be the subject of this antiquarian review. The book is available in PDF on Presbyterians of the Past and can be downloaded by clicking Download Now! However, before getting into […]

On Reformation Day, the posting of Martin Luther’s theses on the door of the castle church in Wittenberg is remembered as the event that launched the Protestant Reformation. Luther’s initial intention was to reform Catholicism and not replace it with another church; Luther’s work, at least in the early years, was submissively reforming rather than […]

The following suggested books concerning the history of the Reformation are listed here because they were not written for professional-academic historians, but they still provide good content and limited delving into the technicalities of doctrines debated during the sixteenth century. The titles selected have been chosen mostly because they provide panoramas of their subjects, but […]

On October 31, 2015, the four-hundred-ninety-eighth anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of his ninety-five theses on the Wittenberg Castle Church door in Germany will be remembered.  The Augustinian monk’s act was not vandalism but a call for discussion and debate of his ninety-five points regarding the use of indulgences in the Roman Catholic Church. In honor of this […]