Places

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The French Huguenots were one of the persecuted groups that sought religious and political freedom in the colony of South Carolina. Many of the Huguenots that moved to the colonies were poor as well as persecuted, so they pursued new opportunities on the other side of the Atlantic in a new land. The Guillebeau “pioneer […]

John Hunter was born on June 29, 1806 to James and Eleanor (Thompson) Morrison in Wallkill Township, Orange County, New York. His early studies were completed in Bloomfield Academy, New Jersey. At twenty-two years of age he professed his faith in Christ in the Presbyterian Church on Cedar Street in New York (currently, Fifth Avenue […]

Joseph was born to physician Joseph and homemaker Rachel Harker Caldwell, April 21, 1773, in Lamington, New Jersey. His paternal grandfather had emigrated from Ulster in the north of Ireland to New Jersey; his mother’s father was a Presbyterian minister and her grandfather, surnamed Lovel, was a Huguenot refugee from France. Joseph had commenced the practice […]

John Rogers was born to Samuel Alexander and Elizabeth (Mclntire) Peale on September 17, 1879, in New Bloomfield, Pennsylvania, which is located northwest of Harrisburg. He studied to prepare for college in a local academy and professed his faith in Christ in the Presbyterian Church at the age of twelve. For his college education he […]

At Pearl Harbor 75 years ago on Sunday morning December 7, 1941, Capt. Thomas L. Kirkpatrick, Presbyterian, was the first chaplain of the United States military killed in World War II. Chaplain Kirkpatrick had been going about his Sunday duties while drinking coffee and chatting with the men in anticipation of the morning service he would […]

Chicora College for Women

September 28th, 2016, at 1:00 pm

Up until roughly the end of the nineteenth century, the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA), the Presbyterian Church in the United States (PCUS), and other Presbyterian and Reformed denominations opened and operated many educational institutions. Chicora College was one of several Presbyterian schools operated in South Carolina that has either closed or […]

When I have occasion to visit churches while traveling, there are three churches I particularly enjoy worshipping in and wandering their properties because of their great histories, faithful preaching, and the historic appeal of their facilities.  One place of worship is the Independent Presbyterian Church, Savannah, Georgia, where the Word has been preached for over […]

Just north of Lexington, Kentucky, heading east for about two miles from exit 120 of Interstate 75 along Ironworks Pike through the scenic bluegrass horse farms with their rail fences and white barns is located a stone building that is Mt. Horeb Presbyterian Church. Though not a large church building, those gathered for its organization […]

Alexander Hall on the Princeton Seminary Campus

September 11th, 2015, at 4:00 am

If you have some time while traveling on I-95 between Philadelphia and New York you might want to visit the scenic and important village of Princeton, New Jersey. It is not only a significant location for its part in the American Revolution but is especially important for Presbyterians. Sites to see for church history fans […]

Zelotes Lee Holmes constructed his eight-sided home with small hand-mixed batches of concrete in Laurens, South Carolina, in 1859. The building is currently known as the Octagon House Apartments. The contribution of the house to the architectural history of the state was recognized in 1973 when it was listed on the National Register of Historic Landmarks. The building is architecturally significant not […]

In a historical tour of Princeton, New Jersey, Nassau Hall on the university campus is on the must-see list.  It is a grand but simple building, surrounded by trees, and its lovely presence reminds visitors of the generations of students that have passed through its doors.  After viewing the façade of Nassau Hall, the curious […]

David B. Calhoun, Our Southern Zion: Old Columbia Seminary, 1828-1927, Banner of Truth, 2012, 380 pages, cloth, illustrated, and index. The city of Columbia was created the capital of South Carolina by the state legislature in 1786.  It was intentionally located near the geographic center of the state to provide citizens equitable access to their […]