Ministers/Teaching Elders

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When one thinks of the faculty and community of nineteenth-century Princeton Seminary the surnames that come to mind might include Alexander, Miller, Warfield, McGill, Green, and Hodge. The name Hodge would be associated with Charles due to his decades of teaching, writing, activity in the church courts, and publishing. Then the next person one might […]

The first annual meeting of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) held in 1789 was convened in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, likewise the location of the second meeting. The third assembly, the one that John Woodhull would moderate, was also held in Philadelphia. From 1789 through the division of […]

Presbytery meetings of the past followed dockets that were built around a general framework or order of events and those events were recorded in the minutes. Minutes were not a transcription of all that was said during the meeting—like a court stenographer might do—but the clerk of presbytery instead recorded summaries of the actions taken […]

Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have often caused fear in the population just as is currently the case with respect to Zika. One of the most fearsome of the diseases, yellow fever, also called “Yellow Jack,” was often transmitted by the needle-bearing insects as they attacked the residents of several cities near the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf Coast, and […]

The state of South Carolina is rich with Presbyterian and Reformed history because of its early settlement by Presbyterian Ulster Scots, Highlanders, Hebrideans, and others from the land of tartans and the Emerald Isle, as well as the Huguenots who were Reformed immigrants from France via a number of routes as they fled persecution. The […]

On April 8, 1835, Bethel Presbytery organized its new church in Lancaster, South Carolina. The church needed a teaching shepherd, so elders who had seen James Thornwell examined for licensure encouraged the congregation to approve presenting him a call through presbytery. On June 12, 1835, after some soul-searching about his spiritual qualifications and calling to […]

William Buell, youngest child of Benjamin and Sybil (Buell) Sprague, was born in Andover, Tolland county, Connecticut, October 16, 1795. As a boy he showed a keen interest in learning, was a voracious reader, and worked long and hard to hone his speaking and writing skills. After attending the common school of Andover and the […]

When the Second General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) convened in First Church, Philadelphia, May 20, 1790, the retiring moderator, John Rodgers, delivered his sermon from Acts 11:24, “For he was a good man,” speaking of Barnabas, “and full of the Holy Ghost and of faith: and much […]

Presbyterians of the Past generally posts articles about people and subjects of the more distant past, but because the United States is celebrating its birthday and many men and women are away from hearth and home on foreign fields, it is appropriate to make an exception for a minister from recent history, Chaplain Bryan J. Weaver. He was a minister […]

Because of the current presidential and other federal elections, news is continually coming out of Washington, which is a city established early in the history of the United States. In 1790, the First Congress was debating and deciding issues such as buying land for what became the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, providing […]

To be a minister for sixty-two years is an accomplishment, but to serve one flock for over six decades is remarkable. During his ministry that spanned beyond three generations, Rev. John McElhenney would have baptized not only children, but also their children, grandchildren, and possibly even their great grandchildren. As those young ones matured he […]

From the earliest days of the Presbyterian Church in Colonial America there was evangelistic work by ministers among their American Indian neighbors. Through the formation of Philadelphia Presbytery, 1706, then the organization of presbyteries into the Synod of Philadelphia, 1716, and finally the consolidation of synods into the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United […]