Ministers/Teaching Elders

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Last week a biography of Dr. Abel McIver Fraser (1856-1933), who was for most of his ministry the pastor of First Presbyterian Church, Staunton, Virginia, was posted on Presbyterians of the Past.  This week a PDF copy of the book honoring him edited by William E. Hudson is available for download. At the time the book […]

Abel McIver Fraser was born in Sumter, South Carolina, June 14, 1856, to Thomas Boone and Sarah Margaret McIver Fraser. For many years Abel’s father was a Presbyterian ruling elder working in various judicatory committees and was a director of Columbia Theological Seminary, while professionally he was a lawyer, a judge for sixteen years, and he […]

Charleston, South Carolina, Map, circa 1892

The Huguenot Church at the corner of Queen and Church Streets in Charleston—the only extant Huguenot congregation in the United States—is a reminder of the importance of French Reformed Protestantism to the history of Charleston and the state of South Carolina. Huguenots began leaving France in 1685 due to the revocation of the Edict of […]

The year 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s Ninety-Five Theses, which were posted on the Castle Church door in Wittenberg to provide points of debate regarding the papacy’s use of indulgences. Indulgences allowed a parishioner to reduce or eliminate time in purgatory for sins. The theses posting is considered the beginning of the Reformation. Even though there had […]

Available for PDF download is a copy of the pamphlet by Conway P. Wing, A Ministry of Fifty Years. A Discourse Delivered February 20, 1881, Before the First and Second Presbyterian Congregations of Carlisle. He heads the first page of the discourse as a “Sermon” with Romans 5:4 and 1 Thessalonians 5:21 as his texts, but […]

John Rogers was born to Samuel Alexander and Elizabeth (Mclntire) Peale on September 17, 1879, in New Bloomfield, Pennsylvania, which is located northwest of Harrisburg. He studied to prepare for college in a local academy and professed his faith in Christ in the Presbyterian Church at the age of twelve. For his college education he […]

Conway Phelps was born the eleventh of thirteen children on February 12, 1809 to Enoch and Mary Oliver Wing near Marietta, Ohio. The newborn boy was a seventh generation descendant of John Wing who had settled in Massachusetts Bay in 1632. Other Wing ancestors were among the original settlers and developers of Sandwich on Cape […]

Joseph Davis was born May 30, 1828 to David and Jane (Davis) Smith in Londonderry County, Ballykelly, Ireland. When he was nineteen years of age his mother and father moved him and his three siblings—William, David, and Martha—to America where they joined the multitude of immigrants seeking a new life in the United States. The […]

When one thinks of the faculty and community of nineteenth-century Princeton Seminary the surnames that come to mind might include Alexander, Miller, Warfield, McGill, Green, and Hodge. The name Hodge would be associated with Charles due to his decades of teaching, writing, activity in the church courts, and publishing. Then the next person one might […]

The first annual meeting of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) held in 1789 was convened in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, likewise the location of the second meeting. The third assembly, the one that John Woodhull would moderate, was also held in Philadelphia. From 1789 through the division of […]

Presbytery meetings of the past followed dockets that were built around a general framework or order of events and those events were recorded in the minutes. Minutes were not a transcription of all that was said during the meeting—like a court stenographer might do—but the clerk of presbytery instead recorded summaries of the actions taken […]

Diseases transmitted by mosquitoes have often caused fear in the population just as is currently the case with respect to Zika. One of the most fearsome of the diseases, yellow fever, also called “Yellow Jack,” was often transmitted by the needle-bearing insects as they attacked the residents of several cities near the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf Coast, and […]