Ministers/Teaching Elders

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I never conversed with nor met R.C. Sproul, but at one time in my life I read much of what he had written and listened to many of his lectures. Audios and videos from Ligonier—when it was in frigid Pennsylvania and not sunny central Florida—along with later instructional series, conferences, and seminars were all important […]

The image of Samuel Stanhope Smith shows him in his later years. Archibald Alexander described his impressions of Dr. Smith when they first met at an earlier time in his tenure at Princeton College. I had met Dr. Samuel Stanhope Smith in Philadelphia, six or seven years before; and certainly, viewing him as in his […]

The photograph was taken during the second General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) in 1974. It shows Stated Clerk Morton H. Smith at the podium as he presented a framed copy of the document “A Message to All the Churches of Jesus Christ” to the moderator of the first general assembly meeting, […]

John Blair Smith was born June 12, 1756 in Pequea, Pennsylvania. His mother, Elizabeth, was the sister of the first two ministers of Fagg’s Manor Presbyterian Church, Samuel and John Blair. The newborn Smith was named for his uncle John Blair. In his early education John showed an insatiable hunger for knowledge that was fed […]

Willis Green Craig was born September 24, 1834 on his father’s estate named Waveland near Danville, Kentucky. The infant boy was named for his mother’s father, Willis Green, who moved to Kentucky from Virginia in 1783 and was actively involved as a Jeffersonian in the national and state political issues of the day. Baby Willis’s […]

“Apologetics: Covenantal, Not Classical” was one of the lectures delivered by Scott Oliphint during Reformed Forum’s recent Reformation 500 conference. I found the seventy-seven-minute-long lecture thorough and beneficial. Since all truth is God’s truth even those who differ with his perspective could benefit from his teaching. Given the title of his discourse some of its […]

For anyone familiar with books published about the history of the Reformation the mention of D’Aubigné is likely to be associated with his historical studies of the era. The first of five volumes appeared in French in 1835 with the last one released in 1853, and  the English translations were published, 1846-1853, under the title History of the […]

It might be thought that one as important to the history of Presbyterians and Scotland as John Knox would have a distinguished place of burial. Hopefully, it would be a pleasant statue, a nice monument, or possibly an obelisk marking his grave. But no, the approximate site of his grave is designated with a square […]

As has been noted often on Presbyterians of the Past, this year is the five-hundredth anniversary of Martin Luther posting his theses regarding some of the practices of Roman Catholicism, but those of us with Presbyterian and Reformed interests seem to have turned it into another Calvin 500th birthday remembrance. The Lutheran and Reformed confessional […]

The military chaplaincy in the United States began with the presidency of George Washington. However, by the time of The Great War there were a number of non-militarily connected organizations involved in support services. For example, Roman Catholicism was not only represented by chaplains in the military but also by the Knights of Columbus. Other […]

In nineteenth-century Macon, Georgia, one of the most respected citizens was John Jones Gresham (1812-1891). He was at various points in his life an attorney, a judge, the mayor of Macon, a state senator, an investor in the Georgia textile industry, a farmer, a member of the county board of education, and for over forty […]

Cabarrus County is located in North Carolina along the northeast border of Charlotte’s Mecklenburg County. It was established in 1792 and named for Stephen Cabarrus who was at the time the speaker of the North Carolina House of Commons. Cabarrus County holds an important place in American history because gold was first discovered at Reed […]