Educators

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I never conversed with nor met R.C. Sproul, but at one time in my life I read much of what he had written and listened to many of his lectures. Audios and videos from Ligonier—when it was in frigid Pennsylvania and not sunny central Florida—along with later instructional series, conferences, and seminars were all important […]

The image of Samuel Stanhope Smith shows him in his later years. Archibald Alexander described his impressions of Dr. Smith when they first met at an earlier time in his tenure at Princeton College. I had met Dr. Samuel Stanhope Smith in Philadelphia, six or seven years before; and certainly, viewing him as in his […]

John Blair Smith was born June 12, 1756 in Pequea, Pennsylvania. His mother, Elizabeth, was the sister of the first two ministers of Fagg’s Manor Presbyterian Church, Samuel and John Blair. The newborn Smith was named for his uncle John Blair. In his early education John showed an insatiable hunger for knowledge that was fed […]

Willis Green Craig was born September 24, 1834 on his father’s estate named Waveland near Danville, Kentucky. The infant boy was named for his mother’s father, Willis Green, who moved to Kentucky from Virginia in 1783 and was actively involved as a Jeffersonian in the national and state political issues of the day. Baby Willis’s […]

“Apologetics: Covenantal, Not Classical” was one of the lectures delivered by Scott Oliphint during Reformed Forum’s recent Reformation 500 conference. I found the seventy-seven-minute-long lecture thorough and beneficial. Since all truth is God’s truth even those who differ with his perspective could benefit from his teaching. Given the title of his discourse some of its […]

For anyone familiar with books published about the history of the Reformation the mention of D’Aubigné is likely to be associated with his historical studies of the era. The first of five volumes appeared in French in 1835 with the last one released in 1853, and  the English translations were published, 1846-1853, under the title History of the […]

The military chaplaincy in the United States began with the presidency of George Washington. However, by the time of The Great War there were a number of non-militarily connected organizations involved in support services. For example, Roman Catholicism was not only represented by chaplains in the military but also by the Knights of Columbus. Other […]

Joseph was born to physician Joseph and homemaker Rachel Harker Caldwell, April 21, 1773, in Lamington, New Jersey. His paternal grandfather had emigrated from Ulster in the north of Ireland to New Jersey; his mother’s father was a Presbyterian minister and her grandfather, surnamed Lovel, was a Huguenot refugee from France. Joseph had commenced the practice […]

The recent death in Northern Ireland of former deputy first minister Martin McGuinness and the passing of Ian Paisley in 2014 are reminders of the more recent conflicts caused by England’s rule of the Irish. Some in the States will remember the days when the evening news often reported violence between English troops and the Irish Republican Army […]

D. X. Junkin, David X., was born January 8, 1808, to Joseph and Eleanor Cochran Junkin in Hope Mills near Mercer, Pennsylvania. He had considerable competition around the house because he and his minister brother George Junkin were two of fourteen children. David’s earliest education was provided by Rev. Thomas L. Anderson in his academy near […]

George was born November 1, 1790, to Joseph and Eleanor Cochran Junkin on the family farm near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. The spiritual ancestors of the Junkins were Covenanters that had entered the American colonies among the Scots-Irish. Eleanor Junkin was surely a busy mother because her fourteen children would have required every second of every day. […]

Charleston, South Carolina, Map, circa 1892

The Huguenot Church at the corner of Queen and Church Streets in Charleston—the only extant Huguenot congregation in the United States—is a reminder of the importance of French Reformed Protestantism to the history of Charleston and the state of South Carolina. Huguenots began leaving France in 1685 due to the revocation of the Edict of […]