Biographies

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My first encounter with the work of Martin Bucer occurred through reading De Regno Christi (The Reign of Christ). The book was written for young King Edward VI of England to guide him through the use of Scripture to rule under the reign of Christ. Edward had been influenced in the direction of Protestantism through […]

Jean (John) was born on July 10, 1509, to Gérard and Jeanne Lefranc Cauvin (Calvin) in Noyon, France. Noyon is about sixty miles northeast of Paris and at the time its cathedral was the seat of the bishop of Noyon, Charles de Hangest. Gérard worked as a legal advisor to the cathedral and served in […]

The military chaplaincy in the United States began with the presidency of George Washington. However, by the time of The Great War there were a number of non-militarily connected organizations involved in support services. For example, Roman Catholicism was not only represented by chaplains in the military but also by the Knights of Columbus. Other […]

Following the First World War, J. Gresham Machen had concluded his work with the YMCA and was travelling in France while awaiting his return to the United States. In a letter written in February 1919, he mentioned to his mother, Mary (Minnie) Gresham Machen, that he had spent a night in Dijon. The city, likely associated more with mustard […]

In nineteenth-century Macon, Georgia, one of the most respected citizens was John Jones Gresham (1812-1891). He was at various points in his life an attorney, a judge, the mayor of Macon, a state senator, an investor in the Georgia textile industry, a farmer, a member of the county board of education, and for over forty […]

The French Huguenots were one of the persecuted groups that sought religious and political freedom in the colony of South Carolina. Many of the Huguenots that moved to the colonies were poor as well as persecuted, so they pursued new opportunities on the other side of the Atlantic in a new land. The Guillebeau “pioneer […]

Cabarrus County is located in North Carolina along the northeast border of Charlotte’s Mecklenburg County. It was established in 1792 and named for Stephen Cabarrus who was at the time the speaker of the North Carolina House of Commons. Cabarrus County holds an important place in American history because gold was first discovered at Reed […]

Church and Saloon—The caption for the picture as it was published in The Church on the Changing Frontier, says “No Room for Both. The Presbyterian Church at Melrose, Montana, and its next-door neighbor, a saloon.” One can imagine a scene in a Sergio Leone western with Clint Eastwood striding towards the saloon with spurs jingling […]

John Hunter was born on June 29, 1806 to James and Eleanor (Thompson) Morrison in Wallkill Township, Orange County, New York. His early studies were completed in Bloomfield Academy, New Jersey. At twenty-two years of age he professed his faith in Christ in the Presbyterian Church on Cedar Street in New York (currently, Fifth Avenue […]

Philadelphia was a hub of activity when Archibald Alexander arrived in May 1807. His relocation from Virginia was to accept a call to the Third Presbyterian Church (Old Pine Street). As he settled into his new situation he was overcome by the poverty in The City of Brotherly Love. He responded by organizing and drafting […]

James Woodrow was born in Carlisle, England, May 30, 1828, the son of Rev. Thomas Woodrow, D.D., a native of Scotland. In 1886 the family moved to Canada, then the next year settled in the United States in Chillicothe, Ohio, where Rev. Woodrow was installed pastor of the First Presbyterian Church. James’s preparatory education for […]

Joseph was born to physician Joseph and homemaker Rachel Harker Caldwell, April 21, 1773, in Lamington, New Jersey. His paternal grandfather had emigrated from Ulster in the north of Ireland to New Jersey; his mother’s father was a Presbyterian minister and her grandfather, surnamed Lovel, was a Huguenot refugee from France. Joseph had commenced the practice […]