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The following article is about the marriage of Prince William and Catherine Middleton in England. It is the first of some occasional articles that will be posted for the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s posting of his theses in Wittenberg. Even though interest in the wedding in 2011 has passed, one of the ministries provided […]

The year 2017 marks the quincentennial of Martin Luther’s posting on the Castle Church door in Wittenberg his Ninety-Five Theses regarding the Roman Catholic Church’s use of indulgences. Indulgences allowed the parishioner to reduce or eliminate works of penance for confessed sins. Luther’s call to debate indulgences is considered the beginning of the Reformation. Even though […]

While strolling the mall just a few days before Reformation Day, I noticed that the theme-oriented temporary stores, glittering foil ice sickles, Santa’s centrally located seat, holiday food vendors, and the colors red and green were already making their annual appearance. Now keep in mind for those unfamiliar with the day of year of the […]

A Drop in the Bucket

November 7th, 2016, at 1:00 pm

It is common to become distressed and fearful about problems whether they are family, work, or government related. The following passages are a few selections from the Bible specifically chosen because of their teaching regarding the nature and character of God. The passages mention the greatness of God, his power and wisdom, his sovereignty, his […]

The following article is divided into two sections. The first section provides information about the invention of movable type printing by Johann Gutenberg and the operation of his innovative technology; the second section considers the importance of printing for the propagation and success of the Reformation by looking at how Martin Luther embraced the process […]

The Presbytery of Fayetteville of the Presbyterian Church in the United States of America (PCUSA) was established a presbytery of the Synod of the Carolinas on October 2, 1812. The geographic bounds of its authority included, roughly, the land west of New Bern, South of Raleigh, and east of Greensboro. Its members at the time […]

Not too long ago we pulled the car up to our home after a morning at church and went to the entrance as usual. On the porch was a brown package complete with the usual abundance of bar coded slick paper and Times New Roman font. We knew what it was. We had ordered a […]

When I have occasion to visit churches while traveling, there are three churches I particularly enjoy worshipping in and wandering their properties because of their great histories, faithful preaching, and the historic appeal of their facilities.  One place of worship is the Independent Presbyterian Church, Savannah, Georgia, where the Word has been preached for over […]

On April 8, 1835, Bethel Presbytery organized its new church in Lancaster, South Carolina. The church needed a teaching shepherd, so elders who had seen James Thornwell examined for licensure encouraged the congregation to approve presenting him a call through presbytery. On June 12, 1835, after some soul-searching about his spiritual qualifications and calling to […]

Was George Gallup Right?

August 5th, 2016, at 1:00 pm

Recently, while taking on the daunting task of cleaning out my many files, paper ones not digital, I ran across a tanned and deteriorating clipping that I had glued right in the middle of a bright white sheet of typing paper and inserted in a folder titled, “Church Statistics.” The title of the brief piece […]

[The following article was originally posted on Presbyterians of the Past on August 17, 2015. In light of the recent discussion regarding the adoption of a logo by the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA), the denomination’s members may be interested in reading about the difficulty Presbyterians of the past encountered when adopting a logo.] The Snake is Discarded Believe […]

Because of the current presidential and other federal elections, news is continually coming out of Washington, which is a city established early in the history of the United States. In 1790, the First Congress was debating and deciding issues such as buying land for what became the U. S. Military Academy at West Point, providing […]