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Those serving on presbytery committees examining candidates for licensure or ordination are required constitutionally to include in their list of questions a few inquiries regarding the individual’s Christian experience and practices. The intention is to discern his consistency of Christian living and growth in sanctification, and as Paul wrote to Timothy, whether he provides a […]

The Lord and the Heart, I Samuel

February 15th, 2018, at 1:00 pm

I have been reading the four-hundredth anniversary facsimile edition of the King James Bible, 1611, published by Oxford University Press. The original King James Bible included the Apocrypha, the Order of Psalms and Lessons to be said at Morning and Evening Prayers, diagrams, and other portions that have been removed from later printings. The 1611 […]

Presbyterian polity is shepherding. It is care of the sheep of Christ’s flock using a connectional relationship with graduated levels of oversight. The fundamental unit for all aspects of shepherding is the elder. The Greek New Testament word presbuteros means elder, thus Presbyterians are those Christians who are shepherded by elders. Presbyterian polity is connectional […]

At seven in the morning of the sixteenth of January one-hundred years ago today, J. Gresham Machen set sail from New York for the purpose of providing United States troops with spiritual counsel and gospel witness while working in support services with the Young Men’s Christian Association in France. The interdenominational YMCA was not his […]

One of the most important doctrinal changes made by Protestants involved reinterpretation of the Latin words hoc est corpus meum which are found in the institution of the Lord’s Supper in Matthew 26:26 of the Catholic Bible, the Vulgate. The English translation of what Jesus said to his disciples is “this is my body.” The […]

The photograph was taken during the second General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in America (PCA) in 1974. It shows Stated Clerk Morton H. Smith at the podium as he presented a framed copy of the document “A Message to All the Churches of Jesus Christ” to the moderator of the first general assembly meeting, […]

The letter that follows this introduction was sent by Edward Winslow from Plymouth Plantation to George Morton in December 1621 as part of what came to be published by Morton with other material as A Relation or Journal of the Beginning and Proceedings of the English Plantation Settled at Plimoth in New England, 1622, henceforth […]

Proverbs 22:6 is a familiar Bible verse for many Christians—Train up a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not depart from it, and it is the locus classicus, the key passage, cited by churches to promote their Sunday and summer Bible programs for children. It is a […]

As the anniversary of the five-hundredth year of Martin Luther’s theses comes to an end, what can be learned from the Reformation and applied to the lives of Christians today? The study of history should result in the experiences of the past finding application to the present and future. This post will consider the importance of sola […]

Sola Scriptura, “Scripture alone,” the Bible, is the cornerstone sola because understanding the meaning of “Christ alone,” “Grace alone,” “faith alone,” and “to God’s glory alone” requires information harvested from sola Scriptura. Some of the key personalities of church history such as Augustine, Martin Luther, John Calvin, and John Knox were influenced first and foremost […]

“Apologetics: Covenantal, Not Classical” was one of the lectures delivered by Scott Oliphint during Reformed Forum’s recent Reformation 500 conference. I found the seventy-seven-minute-long lecture thorough and beneficial. Since all truth is God’s truth even those who differ with his perspective could benefit from his teaching. Given the title of his discourse some of its […]

A mighty fortress is our God, a bulwark never failing; our helper he amid the flood of mortal ills prevailing are the familiar opening words written by Martin Luther in his great hymn, A Mighty Fortress. It was composed in 1527, which was a particularly difficult year for the Luther household because both Martin and […]