Articles

Page 1 of 4


A mighty fortress is our God, a bulwark never failing; our helper he amid the flood of mortal ills prevailing are the familiar opening words written by Martin Luther in his great hymn, A Mighty Fortress. It was composed in 1527, which was a particularly difficult year for the Luther household because both Martin and […]

The significantly faster duplication available through printing as compared with  a scribe and quill gave Luther and others the means to quickly present their views and respond to critics. As the 500th anniversary of the Ninety-Five Theses approaches, it was the printing press that facilitated distribution of Luther’s views regarding indulgences. However, the rapid technology cut […]

Bishop of Hippo Augustine created a massive body of works which is often appealed to by Roman Catholics and Protestants alike. The thinking behind the Reformation was seeded by the ad fontes principle of the Renaissance and for theologians the sources were often the church fathers, particularly Augustine. For example, the Battles edition of Institutes […]

The military chaplaincy in the United States began with the presidency of George Washington. However, by the time of The Great War there were a number of non-militarily connected organizations involved in support services. For example, Roman Catholicism was not only represented by chaplains in the military but also by the Knights of Columbus. Other […]

Church Design—Lighting

July 22nd, 2017, at 1:00 pm

In the colonial days of America congregations sometimes met outdoors for services because they did not have a building for worship. A group interested in having a church in their settlement gathered in the shade of a large tree or under the canopy of a forest or orchard. In at least one case a group […]

The French Huguenots were one of the persecuted groups that sought religious and political freedom in the colony of South Carolina. Many of the Huguenots that moved to the colonies were poor as well as persecuted, so they pursued new opportunities on the other side of the Atlantic in a new land. The Guillebeau “pioneer […]

John Hunter was born on June 29, 1806 to James and Eleanor (Thompson) Morrison in Wallkill Township, Orange County, New York. His early studies were completed in Bloomfield Academy, New Jersey. At twenty-two years of age he professed his faith in Christ in the Presbyterian Church on Cedar Street in New York (currently, Fifth Avenue […]

Communion tokens became prominent in Reformed churches at least partially due to John Calvin advocating their use. In a letter to Guillaume Farel written from Strasbourg, March 29, 1540, Calvin commented regarding the Lord’s Supper that “On Easter-day, when I gave out the invitation that we were to celebrate the Supper on next Lord’s day, […]

Philadelphia was a hub of activity when Archibald Alexander arrived in May 1807. His relocation from Virginia was to accept a call to the Third Presbyterian Church (Old Pine Street). As he settled into his new situation he was overcome by the poverty in The City of Brotherly Love. He responded by organizing and drafting […]

The transcription of the article, “A Belligerent D.D.,” that follows this introduction is from the Public Ledger, Memphis, Tennessee, Nov. 14, 1867. The belligerent Doctor of Divinity was Robert J. Breckinridge. The Presbyterian National Union Convention (PNUC) convened in the First Reformed Presbyterian Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1867. The meeting had been proposed […]

One of the subjects mentioned in the two-volume set, Historical and Literary Memorials of Presbyterianism in Ireland, 1623-1731, by Thomas Witherow, as well as other histories of Ireland and its churches is the regium donum. The Latin regium donum means “Royal Gift” or “Royal Bounty.” It refers to funds given in Ireland to select denominations […]

After the United States declared war on April 6, 1917, the military and organizations associated with supporting the troops overseas were trained and prepared for relocation to the front. Included among the collection of organizations interested in supporting the troops were denominational chaplains and interdenominational workers. The General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in the United States […]