Month: November 2015

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The walking distance by the most direct route from the location of what was once Washington College in Washington County, Tennessee, to the Presbyterian seminary in Princeton, New Jersey, is just short of six-hundred miles. If one was to make the trek today it would run parallel to modern roads including I-81 through the Shenandoah […]

During the early to middle decades of the nineteenth century there was likely not an issue of a western Presbyterian periodical that did not have at least one mention of the name, “Breckinridge.” The August 10, 1865 issue of the Western Presbyterian, shown in the picture, provides a good example of the many occurrences of […]

Just north of Lexington, Kentucky, heading east for about two miles from exit 120 of Interstate 75 along Ironworks Pike through the scenic bluegrass horse farms with their rail fences and white barns is located a stone building that is Mt. Horeb Presbyterian Church. Though not a large church building, those gathered for its organization […]

Dr. Samuel Miller’s eldest daughter, Margaret, made the acquaintance of John Breckinridge during his student years in the village of Princeton and they were married in January 1823. They enjoyed a happy marriage and were blessed with six children, three of which grew to maturity. John’s marriage to the daughter of a Princeton educator was […]

If you compare the portrait of Robert Breckinridge to one of B. B. Warfield you can see that some of the “Breckinridge” physical characteristics made their way down the two generations to Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield. Particularly, the nose, hairline, even the eyes show similarities, though the eyes of Robert Jefferson look like he is not […]

William Lewis Breckinridge, the eighth child of Hon. John and Mary Hopkins (Cabell) Breckinridge, was born at Cabell’s Dale near Lexington, Kentucky, July 22, 1803. He would be the youngest son to grow to maturity behind the eldest, Joseph Cabell, followed in age by John, and then Robert Jefferson. Another son, James Monroe, would be […]

When Samuel Miller Breckinridge entered the Fort Street Presbyterian Church in Detroit, Michigan, for the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in 1891, he found himself in a spacious and ornate sanctuary. The central pulpit was set in front of the banks of brass organ pipes where it was clearly visible to each seat in […]